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What is Art?  What is Fine Art?  What and why is there a difference?  I have a degree in Fine Art and an Inter-disciplinary minor in Art History and Religion, which is convenient, since the subject matter of what is Art, and what is Fine art are tied up some in all these subjects.

choosewellyourfight

This piece is a representation of a work of art by myself, Ellen M. Latta, completed in 2017.  It is rendered in oil paint on masonite. The title of the piece is “Choose Well Your Fight”. This particular painting has an original poem painted on the back of the panel also created by me. It would be an interesting detail in any Certificate of Authenticity as in no other place would this poem be rendered in oil paint written in cursive by the hand of the artist.  It is better than a signature, which is easy to forge. The hand-painted poem is not so easy to forge.

The word “art” simply means to make something, thus anything that is made might be called art. Craftsmanship means it’s made to a standard that is recognizably excellent, and possibly repeatable in the same manner. Knitters and crotchetiers are examples of both artists and crafters. Custom furniture makers are another example of artists and crafters. Industrial designers are artists, and the processes that produce the designs are craftsmanship. I salute all the artists and crafters of designs for their excellent contributions to our high standard of living.

Back when Michelangelo was a lad, the landed gentry were not supposed to get their hands dirty. Doing craft work, painting, masonry, carpentry, wagon making, wheel making, blacksmithing, all of these were considered menial labor not to be performed by those who were in charge. That was considered peasants work.  It might be skilled work, but it was still a lowly occupation. The landed gentry learned swords and maces and all sorts of deadly fighting skills, and control tactics.  One of the control tactics then as now, was information and the manipulation and suppression of the same.

As a young lad Michelangelo had watched a stone mason working sculpture and developed a passion for it. His father did not approve, but Michelangelo was not so easily dissuaded.  In order to make the work of his son not be looked down on, Michelangelo’s Father came up with a brilliant plan to separate the craftsman’s work out and created an entirely new field of work approved by the landed gentry for their offspring.

Since information and the manipulation of ideas was part of the landed gentries stock in trade, “Fine Art” was set apart from craft work by the introduction of symbology that conveyed a separate message contained within the work. Sometimes the symbology was hidden, and sometimes it was blatant, but always it was present in the work. Modern Art still contains these requirements to meet the threshold of Fine Art, thus the publicized write up by a recognized art critic is essential.

There are whole books dedicated to the language of symbology.  Certain things present in the work are meant to convey specific meanings. Fruit, flowers, geometry, numbers, or quantities of items all have specific meanings. Animals can represent ideas and concepts as well. Colors always have affects, but also may convey other things depending on the context of the piece. A line may be just a line, or it may point to something.  A shape may be meant to convey a form or a specific idea. The roughness or smoothness of a piece may also convey more than one type of meaning, or such treatment may be meant to provide a more subtle provision.

Fine art lies at the intersection of politics, high-finance, communications, psychology, and craftsmanship; the latter consideration being of less importance than the former. An officially recognized work of Fine Art becomes a vehicle for the protection of or the transfer of wealth. The major fine art auction houses are the international facilitators and officially sanctioned record keepers of these financial exchanges. Museums, and art galleries are secondary vehicles of these transactions.

Art is one of the things that is not taxed in the same way that most property is taxed. It can be used to protect an amount of money. One person may convey an amount of money to another person through the means of a Fine Art purchase as well.  The item purchased should have an authentic seal of approval of it’s possible future value through the use of officially sanctioned Fine Art critics who publicly proclaim an artist’s work to be worthy of the title of collectible.

If a person is conveying an amount of money between parties through the use of Fine Art, it is generally preferred that the art is difficult to make forgeries of.  Documentation is required.  A gestural work, in art’s language, is a rapid stroke that roughly draws a subject.  Gestural Art has found a particularly important niche in the fine art world, as it’s nearly impossible to make a good forgery of a truly large gestural work.

This latter form of abstract art has landed some confused criticism from many who proclaim that their five-year old could make better art than that seen in some museums.  Indeed, it may be true that the five-year old might make a better representation of something; however, the five-year old is not officially sanctioned by authorized critics within the art world to make symbolic art for sale to collectors; thus the sloppily drawn noodles of line that depict whatever fancy has struck the sanctioned artist become a cashable check for those looking to protect their assets with something non-taxable.

When the average person attacks the value of a work of proclaimed fine art, based on the lack of representative craftsmanship, they misunderstand the purpose of the piece. It likely is a representation of money and power and sometimes even position. To treat it as anything else is to threaten the financial stability of many of the world’s top fortune collectors. This was more probably the reason for the Bonfire of the Vanities than the purported religious excuse that was used in the destruction of much of Europe’s Fine Art collections in the middle ages.

One need not actually destroy the works themselves to destroy the financial footing of those who own the work. One needs only destroy the officially sanctioned recognized value of the pieces to drastically reduce the net worth of the individuals who own them. Hitler’s Degenerate Art exhibition, staged by Adolf Ziegler in 1937, was an instance where the acclaimed value of some types of art, or works by individuals who were not approved of by Hitler’s regime, were devalued by proclamation of a Nation state. The devaluation of these artists work, instantly reduced the net worth of many art collectors within Germany and their occupied territories.The more certain method of this destruction though, is to destroy the works themselves, as there is no coming back from that.

Some people are purchasing Fine Art through the Auction houses and immediately shipping it into a vault underground.  This is a form of tax safe haven, and a hopeful insurance check against possible disaster. As with most investments, it’s not guaranteed to pay off, but there is historical precedent for the idea of getting value back at some time in the future.  One might want to store up the auction house catalog as well as the certificate of authenticity and the letter of provenance to the piece as an additional set of proofs of the value of the work.

The certificate of authenticity is a form that the Artist may provide stating that the work in hand is indeed their work and not that of a forger or rogue print maker. The letter of provenance is a detailed history of the trail of owners, verifying that it is legitimately owned and not a stolen work of art.  If a work has been stolen and found and returned to the owner, these details are included in the  history of the work.   With a true work of Fine Art, the certificate of authenticity and the letter of provenance are as important as the work itself to maintain and verify the value of the work.

This is a very general explanation of the realm of Fine Art. If you found this information helpful, write in the comments below. Let me know if there is more you would like to know about the subject of Fine Art, or any particle field  of Fine Art.  I will be happy to provide more detailed information.

 

Ellen M Story, Ellen M. Lattz at emariaenterprises, llc. January 2019.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story, Ellen M. Lattz at emariaenterprises, llc with appropriate, and specific direction to the original content.

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That state of mind which demands that things be the way we believe they should be, regardless of the feelings or circumstances of others.  Two year olds are idealists.  When they don’t get their way, they throw temper tantrums.  When a mature adult sees this, they understand that what they are witnessing is an immature mindset, lacking understanding of what is good for it, what is possible, and even more, the proper way to convince someone that what you want is what should be provided.

The current leader of our country has been accused of being a big baby, as though it were he who was throwing temper tantrums. While his style of speech may be bombastic, it is hardly taking place in the realm of temper tantrum.  Theodore Roosevelt was also known for being bombastic, yet I’ve seen no disparaging remarks about him or his Presidency in comparison to this President.

On the other hand, I’ve seen lots of images and videos of full grown persons having screaming fits in public since this election occurred. It’s as though they had never in their lives experienced being told no, you can’t always get what you want, no matter how much you think you should have it.  Of course, they had been being promised that what they thought they wanted was guaranteed to happen.

Perhaps it’s a little bit understandable under those circumstances, but still, it’s been a whole year, and people are still behaving as though they never learned how to take turns.  Remember that nice book, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten? It’s like that. There are other priorities that have taken precedence at the moment.  Wait a bit, watch what happens and if things don’t get better, then it will be your turn.

On the other hand, if things do get better, maybe it’s not as bad as you were told it was going to be. Perhaps the people in charge aren’t heinous atrocities. Perhaps they are actually real human beings with a different sense of style. Perhaps we should stop passing judgement before they’ve done anything to have judgement passed on them for. I think that attitude is called prejudice.  Perhaps you’ve heard of it?

Inspirational Reads:

On Respect by A Frank Angle

© Ellen M Lattz and emariaenterprises, llc 2016.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author, Ellen M. Lattz, and/or blog owner, is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M. Lattz, and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

I’m sure that my next few statements will surprise some people.  Many of my opinions have been on the side of what most would call conservative.  But the protesters of Occupy Wall Street aren’t just a bunch of crazies any more than the Tea Party protesters were.  There are thoughtful people in both camps.  Sure, there are some who are protesting with no fixed objective in mind, just a general sense of dis-satisfaction, but that can be enough when things are squeezing you so bad.

I found that there are some thoughtful writers who seem to be catching on, but still leave open any specific agenda for the movement.  Others have picked up on one or two points, like Re-instating the Glass-Steagall Act but believe that the movement has a  potential for negative impact and therefore will continue to be largely marginalized.

My first reaction to the movement was a happy grin.  At last, someone is taking the money lenders to task again.  My second reaction was, gee, isn’t this kinda how the Bolshevik revolution started?  Maybe this last point is the reason that more people are not getting involved.  I thought about this a while, and decided that it was unlikely that any of the protesters wanted the U.S. to turn into another failed communist regime, with it’s incipient lack of production incentives, and dreary one party system.  In fact, some of the protesters are actually complaining about the lack of any real, effectual diversity in our current party structure (see comment below).

LG

Chicago
November 17th, 2011 4:38 am
That, and there’s the fact that we of the movement are Post-Partisan. No one thinks a system historically entrenched in two-party politics is a healthy system. How can what is theoretically only two voices (effectively one, in most ways that we care about) possibly speak for the most diverse nation on this planet? Even practically homogeneous Germany has a multiparty system.

So, given that, I’m thinking that there are probably a number of things that the occupy protesters would agree with me on.

1) Since the banks were seen as “Too Big To Fail” and required a hand out to save us from their fall (which was entirely due to their own greed, and not just to the fact of being told not to discriminate on home buyers), the banks should be required to break-up into smaller pieces.  I would recommend  that they also be required, like many Credit Unions, to only hold real-estate in an area near where they are physically located.  This would solve some of the problems of the bundled investments, and the inability to actually discuss ways to stop a foreclosure from happening.  At least people would have someone they could go talk to about it.  If this causes a problem with really large loans, then several banks in one area could go in on a single loan together, but they would all have to be in the same area.

2) Banks should be taxed at the same rate that they charge interest on their most risky loans, flat out, no loopholes.

3) Bundled investments have to go.  If people want a diverse portfolio, they can shop around to get what they need, or their stock broker/agent can shop around for them.  Practically guaranteeing that an investment won’t fail has Never been allowed.  You pays your money and you takes your chances.

4) I absolutely agree on re-instating the Glass-Steagall Act, and on putting a reasonable cap on usury. Getting charged more than 15% is pushing the boundaries of robbery.  Especially if the initial sign-up had a much lower interest rate.

5) The Credit companies should be required to leave due dates where they were when the person signed up.  There is no reasonable argument for changing a due date.   People who have an automatic payment set-up in their online banking shouldn’t have to read every piece of mail that comes in from the credit companies and jump through hoops to keep from getting charged extra fees.

6) There should be a reasonable cap put on fees.  Getting charged $35.00 or more for a credit purchase that the company allowed to go through is outrageous.  If the company didn’t want the purchase to go through, they should have just said no.  If they  are willing to let it go through, they are already making interest on it anyway, there is no need to charge more for the transaction.  The neediest people are being destroyed by unreasonable demands, and unreasonable changes in their agreements.

7) Congress may not like taxing themselves more, but they need to listen to the roar that is coming up around them.  The other millionaires are telling you to tax them more too.  You cannot expect to live so well, when so many are living so poorly, and not reap what you have sown. If you don’t actually raise the tax, then you need to lower the benefit of the tax loopholes.  I would still be in favor of encouraging investment in research and development, but at a lower rate of tax incentive.  If the little guy has to pay taxes, so should you.

8)  Corporations are Not people.  Legally, we may treat them as an entity for lawsuit purposes, but they don’t have a vote.  The people that work there have enough votes already.  If you are going to treat them as people, then they should have a cap of $2,500.00 put on their contributions too.  That would include the money spent on informational commercials in support of any particular agenda.

9) Since insurance companies did such a fabulous job of lobbying to set up the Health Care Reform, they should carry the burden of the results.  I had a boss who owned a company, and was a partner in several others.  He had a heart attack.  His insurance company sued the state to cover him with Medicare so they wouldn’t have to.   We get told all the time that it’s the poor people who are the reason that health care is so expensive.  This guy wasn’t poor at all.  And neither was his insurance company. If insurance companies don’t like this, then they should be nationalized.

10) The credit reporting companies, Equifax, Transunion, and Experion need to go away, and no other system of large scale collaboration between loan companies should be allowed to exist.   Manipulating our credit scores to be able to charge the most interest, or whatever they do….   wrong, wrong, wrong.  It’s nothing short of a Financial Cartel.

If you agree with me on this, like my post.  If you agree on some things but not on others, comment and let us all hear what you really want.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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