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Ron Paul

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Mitt Romney, former governor of Massachusetts,...

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Ron Paul, and his supporters, know what it’s like to have their words taken out of context and used to malign them unfairly.  As a result, being the fair man that he is, Ron Paul took a nearly unprecedented step during a Presidential Primary run to defend one of his fellow candidates , Mitt Romney, who was getting that treatment, yet again.

Mitt Romney was describing, to a rapt  audience in New Hampshire, his philosophy of keeping businesses honest, and hardworking, by saying that he Liked being able to fire people who provide services to him.

After all, what happens in a business that you can’t fire?  It tends to get cocky, arrogant, and self-serving.  Instead of providing good service to you, you end up just being the vehicle to providing more money to the ever increasing demands from the company. This is Not a good business to consumer relationship model.

As an example, lets look at what has happened to service from our city/county utilities.  First, they tend to have removed as much as possible, the face to face contact.  In our area, you have to go to a bill paying service center that is mostly about check cashing, and otherwise is about paying several different bills in cash.  And on top of all that, you have to Pay this bill paying service center more money to let you pay your bill here. Of course, you Can pay them electronically…. but again,there is no personal contact.

Then, the utility companies removed as much as possible of the voice to voice contact, sending customers through an ever expanding menu of options designed primarily to frustrate the user, wear you down, and prevent you from actually solving problems.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve gotten to where I just hold the phone for five minutes while it runs through it’s litany of menu choices and let it finally decide that I must be one of the three people in the nation still using a dial phone, and then it will let me talk to an Actual person, whereupon I usually get Much better results (Usually).

Or, how about the Cable company.  Do they give good service?  I remember when they first came into existence, and people said, why do we want these guys?  We have free T.V. now.  And the Cable companies said, “We’ll keep the cost down.  It’ll be real low.”   And it was, for a little while, until the initial contract ran out, by which time people were hooked on the convenience of tuning in to Many more show choices, and the cable companies raised the rates.  A lot. And they make it difficult to return the equipment in a timely manner; And they charge you all kinds of extra fees…  I could go on, as I’m sure you all could too.

The same thing happens with retail companies that have a lock on market products in an area.  They too, become difficult to work with and start thinking that They are doing You a favor by letting you shop at their store.

Suffice it to say, if you don’t have choices, firing the people/companies who “Serve” you is difficult; then, You end up serving them instead.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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A field of opium poppies in Burma.

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English: Four ounces of low-grade marijuana, u...
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Have I ever told you that I am For legalizing drugs?  Especially the cannabis plant?

This position might lead you to believe that I do drugs, or that I Want to do drugs if they were legal; however, I don’t  do them, nor do I Want to do them.

I’ll explain my position thus:

CIA Map of International drug pipelines

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Making these drugs illegal did Not make them unavailable.  It does not save anyone from poor processing methods. Nor does it save our society from the evils of them.   In fact, quite the opposite has occurred.

1) Pretty much anyone who wants to use them can get them.

2) There are no safeguards on their manufacture,  and

3) It is Very expensive to maintain the criminal justice system around the unenforceable and really lucrative sale and distribution of illegal drugs,

4) There is a far larger cost to human lives than would be sustained by people doing the drugs legally, because of the nature of doing business with illegal items, and further;

5) The only people who benefit are those who:

a.  Do not pay taxes on the sale of them,

b.  Do not choose to abide by our laws,

c.   Do not care about the value of anyone else’s life, and

d.   Represent a decided hazard to the society around them.

Making the drugs legal would m0ve the growing, and manufacture of them into a different realm.  The public would benefit by:

a. Being able to collect taxes on the sale of them,

b. Better manufacture methods would be employed,

c.  Fees would be collected for the licensing of the facilities, and

d. Fines imposed if the methods for producing them caused a greater hazard to the users.

When legal drugs for sale to the public are created, they are generally tested to see what dosage is appropriate.  Taking any of them at more than the recommended dosage is courting disaster, but especially when it’s being done as a method of “entertainment“.  At present, there are no set limits on the use of drugs that are deemed “illegal,” but which are nevertheless being used as entertainment, and little to no judgement being used in the application of this entertainment.

I don’t know whether it’s sadder that so many more of our youth are lost to this form of entertainment, or that I have actually heard of some respectable, middle aged, supposedly rational people who have begun, late in life, experimenting with various drugs; only to end up, like so many of our youth, as addicted, mentally strung out, and physically destroyed individuals.

This form of entertainment ends so badly.  The feel good only lasts for a little while (if at all), and the crash on the other side leaves you worse off than you were before, but people will still do them anyway; so the best scenario for this is to make them legal, and issue guidelines for safer use in this context.

In addition, the taxes collected on the sale of them, could be used to pay for the health care of the individuals who hurt themselves or others with the use of the drugs.

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Dear Ford Motors,
Thank you for your candor in reporting about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  It isn’t often I see the decency that you have displayed in your summation of this faith.  You have given me another reason to shop Ford in the future.  If I were a betting person, I’d buy Ford stock about now 🙂  What the heck, it’s a sucker bet.  Buying Ford stock after the publication of this article isn’t a gamble at all.  You’re gonna get some Great business in the coming years from members of this faith.

I wrote this as a comment on another blog published by Alan Osmond (Alan, I hope you don’t mind my re-posting it here – it’s going to show up twice in my Facebook page now, as that is where I saw it first) who posted the following article:

Following is an interesting article written by Ford Motor Company for its employees. It was presented by the ‘Ford Interfaith’ group as a message about the LDS Church .

The Ford Interfaith group promotes unity by sharing information about all faiths and features these types of articles about various religions and faiths.

QUICK FACTS & INTERESTING TIDBITS about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Fleeing continued mob attacks 158 years ago, the first Mormon
pioneers desperately started their Westward trek from Illinois in the dead of winter. Of the 70,000 who began this 1300-mile journey, 6,000 were buried along the way, including many children. The following are quick facts and interesting tidbits about this now flourishing church.

OVERVIEW

* Named “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints”; informal
nicknames are “LDS” or “Mormon” -named after the prophet-historian

* Believes it is the Lord’s restoration of original Christianity as
foretold to occur before Christ’s Second Coming.

* Core focus is that Christ and His teachings bring happiness in this
life and exaltation in the next.

HISTORY

* In 1820 14-yr-old Joseph Smith told of a vision of God and Christ
foretelling a church restoration.

* Organized in New York in 1830, the church moved to near Cleveland, then near Kansas City, then Illinois .

* Fleeing Illinois , Mormon pioneers founded Salt Lake City in Utah and over 600 other Western communities.

SALT LAKE CITY

* Temple Square in Salt Lake has over 5 million annual visitors, more
than the Grand Canyon .

* The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is the world’s most famous choir and has the world’s oldest radio program.

* The Salt Lake Temple is the most famous, but there are 128 other
temples built here and around the world while
others are under construction.

* Home of the world’s largest genealogy database; visit it online or
through 3,700 free branch libraries.

ACTIVE CONGREGATIONS

* Sunday services entail a three-hour block of three meetings; about
27,000 congregations exist worldwide.

* Highly vibrant programs exist for youth, children, singles, men, and women; very strong family focus.

* Everyone has a calling; some surveys show LDS have the highest U.S. attendance and service rates.

* Families receive personal fellowship visits at home from other members on a monthly basis.

FINANCES

* Members tithe 10 percent, plus donate generously to the needy the first Sunday of each month.

* Clergy and all other congregational positions are unpaid (however, much of the janitorial is paid).

* The church has no debt; all buildings are paid for in cash (average of two new congregations a day).

* The paid positions in Salt Lake are famously low-salaried; funds are frugally used and tightly audited.

HEALTH CODE

* With a health code from 1833, LDS avoid alcohol, tobacco, illegal
drugs, coffee, and tea (herbal tea is ok).

* This 1833 code also teaches grains (especially wheat), fresh fruits and vegetables, and sparing use of meat.

* A UCLA study showed that active LDS live longer than most Americans, men by 11 years, women by 8.

* Utah is 50th in smoking, alcohol consumption, drunk driving, heart disease, cancer, and sick days.

EDUCATION

* With four colleges, Utah ‘s BYU with 30,000 students is the largest
single-campus private college.

* BYU Independent Study with 130,000 students is North America (340 web courses, 530 via mail).

* Seminary, a daily class usually held around 6:00 A.M., serves 376,000 high school students.

* There are Institutes of Religion at 1,950 colleges worldwide that serve 367,000 college students.

* The church operates schools in parts of the Pacific Ocean and Mexico for 10,000 students.

* Utah is 50th in spending per pupil, but first in adults that graduated from high school and attended college.

WOMEN

* In 1842 the “Relief Society” was organized; it’s the largest women’s
organization in the world.

* Wyoming was first to allow women to vote; Utah was second, two months later, in 1870.

* Women preach from the pulpit and serve as organization presidents, teachers, committee chairs, etc.

SHARING CHRIST’S GOOD NEWS

* 61,000 missionaries serve in 165 countries; 93 percent are college-age; 22 percent are female.

* Unpaid and paying their own way, most work 65 hours a week for two years, often in a new language.

MEMBERSHIP DISTRIBUTION

* LDS are 70 percent of Utah, 30 percent of Idaho; after Catholics, LDS are the largest sect in 10 states.

* The church has 5.5 million members in the U.S., making it the fourth largest individual U.S. denomination.

* Some memberships: New Zealand 95k, Japan 115k, UK 175k, Philippines 500k, Brazil 900k, Mexico 925k.

* Worldwide 51 percent are female; about 55 percent are not Caucasian; about 70 percent are converts.

MEMBERSHIP GROWTH

* For the last 15 years, every day an average of 800+ people worldwide joined the LDS church.

* Half of the growth is in Latin America, but the rate of growth is
highest in Africa and the former Soviet bloc.

* Worldwide membership just passed 12 million, a tenfold increase in 50 years.

* In 1984 a non-LDS professor estimated 265 million members by 2080; so far growth has been faster.

* As this growth has been steady, it will be the next major world religion since Islam.”

CHARITY/SERVICE

* Members in need obtain welfare from the LDS Church (thus Utah
government welfare spending is very low).

* LDS donate time at 220 welfare storehouses or canneries and about 400 farms.

* There are 210 employment centers placing over 175,000 people annually, and 64 family service centers.

* The church operates 46 thrift stores, in part to provide employment for the disadvantaged.

* The 61,000 missionaries spend half a day each week doing

HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE

* Over 200 million pounds of food, clothing, and medicine were donated in the last 20 years in 147 countries.

* Almost all of this help is to non-LDS; LDS charities also work with and donate to many non-LDS charities.

* Very rapid disaster relief has been given in 144 major disasters since 1986.

* Almost 3,000 welfare “missionaries” work without pay in 55 countries (farm instructors, doctors, teachers, etc…).

* LDS charities fund a wide variety of projects like drilling water wells or funding small business startup loans.

* New in 2001, members in poor areas can get low-rate college loans;
10,000 loans have been made to date.

GRAB BAG

* Utah is first in: charitable giving, producing scientists, household computers, children with two parents, and birth rate.

* Noted LDS included five senators, and other famous dignitaries
(click on link)
the Osmonds, Gladys Knight, Steve
Young, and the inventor of TV -Philo T. Farnsworth.

* LDS played a key role in the 2002 Winter Olympics; the chair was the former governor of Massachusetts .

* Hawaii ‘s #1 tourist site is the LDS Polynesian Cultural Center ( Tonga and the Samoas are one-third LDS).

* LDS have sponsored Boy Scout troops since 1913; 23 percent of all Scout troops are LDS.

* The BYU Women’s Cross Country were national champions or in second place each of the last seven years.

DETROIT AREA

* The Detroit metro area has 30 congregations; the Dearborn chapel is on Rotunda by Ford’s Building #5.

* Detroit has a temple, storehouse, cannery, employment and family
service office, and family history libraries.

* LDS include former Governor Romney, three former Lions quarterbacks,
and hundreds of Ford employees.

A member of Ford’s Interfaith Network,
the author of this note sends out monthly interfaith notes to thousands of Ford employees who have asked to receive them.

Watching the debates was, as always, educational.  Each of the candidates has been tested in this kind of forum before.  Each of them were prepared for most of the questions, and each of them had their shiny moments.  As always, each of them also revealed their weaknesses.

All candidates have weaknesses.  Most candidates who have made it this far, have strengths.  Our job is to decide which of them has:

1)  the best ideas, or the most feasible ideas, to aid our country in surviving and growing,

2) the most likely to succeed in getting those ideas to work,

3) can carry enough votes to win the race.

It’s a tough choice.

Given that I don’t think the current occupant of the position is, or has been doing a good job, he is not on my radar for getting voted for.  That leaves looking at the other runners in the field.  There have been quite a few to choose from.  Many of them have really good ideas.  Some of them have some hare brained schemes that sound catchy, but in reality would hurt more people than it would help.  Some of them are dead right about a number of things, but the feasibility of some of their solutions is impossible.

Under the circumstances, it’s impossible to choose one that says everything that you want to hear, and/or whose ideas would work if elected. So choosing is based on best possible scenario.

For me, that best possible scenario would be a match with Mitt Romney running for President and Ron Paul as Vice President.

Between them, there could be some real, effective change in Washington.   And that’s a ticket worth a 10K bet.

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

If you absolutely knew you were right, and the other guy was wrong, would you offer to make an all out bet with the one who was wrong to see if he would back down?

If you were playing poker and you had a royal flush, would you go all in to bet on it?

From a poker playing angle it probably wouldn’t be a smart move, because the other guy would fold, but that’s what was wanted in this case. For the other guy to admit he wasn’t sure of his facts.  To fold his hand.

That’s what happened in the  debate  between Rick Perry and Mitt Romney.  Rick made a false statement about what Romney had written in his book, and Romney knew it.  Romney offered Rick a sucker bet of $10,000.00.  Rick backed down because he wasn’t that certain of his facts. Rick probably figured he could get away with making the false statement because it might be difficult for someone to fact check it.

There’s a lot of buzz about this issue, even whole websites set up to take advantage of it.  Democrats are jumping up and down with glee over it.  Billboards are being planned, and television ads that highlight what $10,000.00 can buy the average American.

The average American would love to win a sure bet like that.  The average American is making $1.00 bets everyday in hopes they can win at least that amount in the Powerball lotteries.  Sure you’ld offer the bet if you Knew you would win.  Who wouldn’t when we all need the money so badly.

Mr. Romney has more than that amount riding on this Presidential race.  He’s betting his whole future on it, and ours.  I sure hope he wins this one.

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I’m not always the most persuasive person.  I call myself straightforward, other people call me blunt.  Either way, you always know where I’m coming from.

Just so you know, I love trees.  They are beautiful.  They are also a renewable resource.  Meaning that they can be regrown.  Here in Maryland, trees grow like weeds.  They can become a serious nuisance when not kept in check.

What I’m getting at, is that I like a nice environment as much as the next person, but there are ways, and then there are ways of having that.

And none of the environmental considerations will matter to any of us if we end up tearing each other apart over no jobs and high oil prices.  So here’s my contribution to the dialogue below.

Subject: THIS IS A VERY INTERESTING OIL STORY, WORTH READING

Oil Anyone?

By the way, this can be verified.

Check it out at the link below !!!!!!

http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911

Cruz Construct

http://www.cruzconstruct.com/services.php

(I do not know where the below letter came from or I would credit it properly, but I got it in my email, and have copied all the bits of it into here).

They are doing a lot of frack sand mining in Wisconsin near Chetek. It’s a special sand used in the extraction process from the oil shale deposits.  As you may know, Cruz Construction started a division in North Dakota just 6 months ago.

They sent every Kenworth (9 trucks) we had here in Alaska to North Dakota and several drivers. They just bought two new Kenworth’s to add to that fleet; one being a Tri Drive tractor and a new 65 ton lowboy to go with it. They also bought two new cranes (one crawler & one rubber tired) for that division.

Dave Cruz said they have moved more rigs in the last 6 months in ND than Cruz Construction moved in Alaska in the last 6 years. Williston, ND is like a gold rush town; they moved one of our 40 man camps down there since there are no rooms available.

Unemployment in ND is the lowest in the nation at 3.4 percent last I checked. See anything in the national news about how the oil industry is fueling North Dakota’s economy?

Here’s an astonishing read. Important and verifiable information: About 6 months ago, the writer was watching a news program on oil and one of the Forbes Bros. Was the guest. The host said to Forbes, “I am going to ask you a direct question and I would like a direct answer; How much oil does the U.S. Have in the ground?” Forbes did not miss a beat, he said, “more than all the Middle East put together.

” The U. S.. Geological Service issued a report in April 2008 that only scientists and oil men knew was coming, but man was it big. It was a revised report (hadn’t been updated since 1995) on how much oil was in this area of the western 2/3 of North Dakota, Western South Dakota, and extreme eastern Montana.

Check THIS out: The Bakken is the largest domestic oil discovery since Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay, and has the potential to Eliminate all American dependence on foreign oil. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates It at 503 billion barrels. Even if just 10% of the oil is recoverable( 5 billion barrels), at $107 a barrel, We’re looking at a resource base worth more than $5.3 trillion.

“When I first briefed legislators on this, you could practically see their jaws hit the floor. They had no idea..” says Terry Johnson, the Montana Legislature’s financial analyst.

“This sizable find is now the highest-producing onshore oil field found in the past 56 years,” reportsThe Pittsburgh Post Gazette. It’s a formation known as the Williston Basin, but is more commonly referred to as the ‘Bakken.’ It stretches from Northern Montana, through North Dakota and into Canada. For years, U. S. Oil exploration has been considered a dead end. Even the ‘Big Oil’ companies gave up searching for major oil wells decades ago. However, a recent technological breakthrough has opened up the Bakken’s massive reserves, And we now have access of up to 500 billion barrels. And because this is light, sweet oil, Those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL !!!!!!

That’s enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years straight. And if THAT didn’t throw you on the floor, then this next one should – because it’s from 2006 !!!!!! U. S. Oil Discovery – Largest Reserve in the World Stansberry Report Online – 4/20/2006 Hidden 1,000 feet beneath the surface of the Rocky Mountains lies the largest untapped oil reserve in the world. It is more than 2 TRILLION barrels.

On August 8, 2005 President Bush mandated its extraction. In three and a half years of high oil prices none has been extracted. With this motherload of oil why are we still fighting over off- shore drilling?

They reported this stunning news: We have more oil inside our borders, than all the other proven reserves on earth. Here are the official estimates: 8 times as much oil as Saudi Arabia 18 times as much oil as Iraq 21 times as much oil as Kuwait 22 times as much oil as Iran 500 times as much oil as Yemen And it’s all right here in the Western United States !!!!!!

HOW can this BE? HOW can we NOT BE extracting this? Because the environmentalists and others have blocked all efforts to help America become independent of foreign oil! Again, we are letting a small group of people dictate our lives and our economy.

WHY? James Bartis, lead researcher with the study says we’ve got more oil in this very compact area than the entire Middle East, more than 2 TRILLION barrels untapped. That’s more than all the proven oil reserves of crude oil in the world today, reports The Denver Post.

Don’t think ‘OPEC’ will drop its price even with this find? Think again! It’s all about the competitive marketplace, it has to. Think OPEC just might be funding the environmentalists? Got your attention yet?

Now, while you’re thinking about it, do this: Pass this along. If you don’t take a little time to do this, then you should stifle yourself the next time you complain about gas prices, by doing NOTHING, you forfeit your right to complain. Now I just wonder what would happen in this country if every one of you sent this to every one in your address book.

“One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferior” . . . Plato

Enthralled with form, the function ignored.

The reason was there, without the rhyme.

Her loss of focus reduced the words

to one of convenience in limited time.

The question nags her to voice her concern.

She hangs her head no longer to worry.

The gift neglected, in moments returns;

the prose, select, when not in a hurry.

What words to us, as time directed,

Birth the newest conceptual image.

Choose carefully the picture selected,

Else chaos reigns o’er the resulting scrimmage.

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Well, hello again.  It’s been a while since I wrote because I’ve been distracted by a number of other intensive efforts, but I’m back now.  I had some time to peruse the internet today and pursue the sometimes chancy proposition of locating enough information on a candidate to be able to tell if I like his position or not.

It’s a tough time to try to determine who might do the best job for us.  We are going to lose some things.  There is no way around it.  So it’s all about choosing what we lose.  Is it stuff that we can do for ourselves by exercising a little self discipline?  Is it something we can grow into?  Is there a way to transition smoothly without doing too much damage?

There are some things that we really can’t do without, and shouldn’t even try to do without at the Federal level.  A strong standing army is one of the Few things that we are Supposed to have at the Federal level, so downsizing that when the world is in so much turmoil isn’t very sensible.

With some candidates, of course there is enough stuff out there, but they didn’t have what I was looking for.   Ron Paul, for instance, is a very good candidate, and has several stances that I really admire, but his foreign policy smacks of isolationism.  We’ve tried that before when we were even Less connected than we are today.  It really doesn’t work well for anybody.

As for Jon Huntsman…  I like and admire him, and I love his foreign policy (as who shouldn’t), and his Utah business policy has been very good for the state of Utah, so Maybe it would also work for the nation.  Would he be a really good President?  Effective? Why do I have doubts about him?  Not because he’s a Mormon, and Not because he’s not likable.  Maybe it’s because he reminds me of someone else.  If he runs as an Independent candidate, I might have to give him another look. But I don’t think he can carry the Republican party.

So let’s get this out of the way. I don’t trust Newt Gingrich.  Not because he wasn’t constitutional enough (at least at one time), and not because he changed his mind some times, but rather, because he changed his mind about the wrong things.  At least, in my opinion, he did.

I’m not against someone who changes their mind sometimes, if the things one learns along the way seem to warrant it, that’s a Good thing.  I just prefer to see them change their mind in the same direction I would.  Gingrich didn’t do that.  He went the other way too many times.

I will dispense with discussing those candidates who are already on their way out.  Enough said already.  So that leaves me with looking again at Mitt Romney.  What does his platform say now?  Jennifer Robin’s recent post in her Right Turn blog lays it out fairly well (and I didn’t have to sign up on anyone’s site to find out).  I like his rational approach to the problems with Medicaid/Medicare, and his stance on job creation (of course, everyone is For job creation, it’s the methodology that is employed to encourage them that has us all on edge).  Mitt’s strategy to give some power back to the states is a definite plus.  The closer the decisions are to the people they affect, the better the outcome usually is (and if it isn’t, you vote out the state government and get new people).  All down the line, things seemed to click for me.  So, unless Romney’s platform changes radically between now and Election day,  I think I’ll vote for him.

I’m sure that my next few statements will surprise some people.  Many of my opinions have been on the side of what most would call conservative.  But the protesters of Occupy Wall Street aren’t just a bunch of crazies any more than the Tea Party protesters were.  There are thoughtful people in both camps.  Sure, there are some who are protesting with no fixed objective in mind, just a general sense of dis-satisfaction, but that can be enough when things are squeezing you so bad.

I found that there are some thoughtful writers who seem to be catching on, but still leave open any specific agenda for the movement.  Others have picked up on one or two points, like Re-instating the Glass-Steagall Act but believe that the movement has a  potential for negative impact and therefore will continue to be largely marginalized.

My first reaction to the movement was a happy grin.  At last, someone is taking the money lenders to task again.  My second reaction was, gee, isn’t this kinda how the Bolshevik revolution started?  Maybe this last point is the reason that more people are not getting involved.  I thought about this a while, and decided that it was unlikely that any of the protesters wanted the U.S. to turn into another failed communist regime, with it’s incipient lack of production incentives, and dreary one party system.  In fact, some of the protesters are actually complaining about the lack of any real, effectual diversity in our current party structure (see comment below).

LG

Chicago
November 17th, 2011 4:38 am
That, and there’s the fact that we of the movement are Post-Partisan. No one thinks a system historically entrenched in two-party politics is a healthy system. How can what is theoretically only two voices (effectively one, in most ways that we care about) possibly speak for the most diverse nation on this planet? Even practically homogeneous Germany has a multiparty system.

So, given that, I’m thinking that there are probably a number of things that the occupy protesters would agree with me on.

1) Since the banks were seen as “Too Big To Fail” and required a hand out to save us from their fall (which was entirely due to their own greed, and not just to the fact of being told not to discriminate on home buyers), the banks should be required to break-up into smaller pieces.  I would recommend  that they also be required, like many Credit Unions, to only hold real-estate in an area near where they are physically located.  This would solve some of the problems of the bundled investments, and the inability to actually discuss ways to stop a foreclosure from happening.  At least people would have someone they could go talk to about it.  If this causes a problem with really large loans, then several banks in one area could go in on a single loan together, but they would all have to be in the same area.

2) Banks should be taxed at the same rate that they charge interest on their most risky loans, flat out, no loopholes.

3) Bundled investments have to go.  If people want a diverse portfolio, they can shop around to get what they need, or their stock broker/agent can shop around for them.  Practically guaranteeing that an investment won’t fail has Never been allowed.  You pays your money and you takes your chances.

4) I absolutely agree on re-instating the Glass-Steagall Act, and on putting a reasonable cap on usury. Getting charged more than 15% is pushing the boundaries of robbery.  Especially if the initial sign-up had a much lower interest rate.

5) The Credit companies should be required to leave due dates where they were when the person signed up.  There is no reasonable argument for changing a due date.   People who have an automatic payment set-up in their online banking shouldn’t have to read every piece of mail that comes in from the credit companies and jump through hoops to keep from getting charged extra fees.

6) There should be a reasonable cap put on fees.  Getting charged $35.00 or more for a credit purchase that the company allowed to go through is outrageous.  If the company didn’t want the purchase to go through, they should have just said no.  If they  are willing to let it go through, they are already making interest on it anyway, there is no need to charge more for the transaction.  The neediest people are being destroyed by unreasonable demands, and unreasonable changes in their agreements.

7) Congress may not like taxing themselves more, but they need to listen to the roar that is coming up around them.  The other millionaires are telling you to tax them more too.  You cannot expect to live so well, when so many are living so poorly, and not reap what you have sown. If you don’t actually raise the tax, then you need to lower the benefit of the tax loopholes.  I would still be in favor of encouraging investment in research and development, but at a lower rate of tax incentive.  If the little guy has to pay taxes, so should you.

8)  Corporations are Not people.  Legally, we may treat them as an entity for lawsuit purposes, but they don’t have a vote.  The people that work there have enough votes already.  If you are going to treat them as people, then they should have a cap of $2,500.00 put on their contributions too.  That would include the money spent on informational commercials in support of any particular agenda.

9) Since insurance companies did such a fabulous job of lobbying to set up the Health Care Reform, they should carry the burden of the results.  I had a boss who owned a company, and was a partner in several others.  He had a heart attack.  His insurance company sued the state to cover him with Medicare so they wouldn’t have to.   We get told all the time that it’s the poor people who are the reason that health care is so expensive.  This guy wasn’t poor at all.  And neither was his insurance company. If insurance companies don’t like this, then they should be nationalized.

10) The credit reporting companies, Equifax, Transunion, and Experion need to go away, and no other system of large scale collaboration between loan companies should be allowed to exist.   Manipulating our credit scores to be able to charge the most interest, or whatever they do….   wrong, wrong, wrong.  It’s nothing short of a Financial Cartel.

If you agree with me on this, like my post.  If you agree on some things but not on others, comment and let us all hear what you really want.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I’ve long stated that the best investment you can make is in canned goods, and other necessities.  You can’t eat gold, or stock certificates, or even real estate (though you can grow gardens on that last).  In the wake of all the repeating disasters, it seems even more important and more sensible.

So, all right you say, I’ll stock up, but what are the best things to stock up on?  The answer isn’t as obvious as it might seem.  There are some things that last well, but you won’t eat them, and some things that you eat regularly, but that don’t last well.  So storing disaster food and resources can be kind of tricky, unless you have lots of extra money to spend on the pre-packeaged ready made disaster food supplies.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t have any extra cash laying around for things like that.  My disaster storage shopping comes out of my regular budget.  I just buy a few extra cans of food each time, and stash them in the back, the oldest stuff up front, so I’ll always use the canned goods before they go bad.

A good can will last at least five years (yes, I’ve tested this with some very well canned peaches).  Some will last longer, depending on the contents, and the way the can is made. So how do you know if it’s a good can?  Test it.  Buy two or three different kinds of any type of canned goods your family likes to eat.  Taste is even more important than can type, because if you and your family don’t like the flavor, or texture, you won’t eat it, and the canned goods will spoil from disuse.   Look at the inside of the can.  Does it have a plain tin can interior?  It’s shelf life is more like two years.  If it has a sort of yellow/gold coating on the interior, it will last longer.

How do you know if a can of something has gone bad?  If the can is leaking any sort of fluid, it’s bad.  If it’s visibly rusting around the rim, check the seal.  If the can lid is movable (that is, it can be pressed inward), it’s bad.  If the can is bulging anywhere, it’s bad.  Throw out bad cans immediately.

The next thing to consider when shopping for disaster storage is what does the meal need to be prepared?  If your recipe calls for something to be added that may not be available during a disaster, due to electrical failures, or road closures or some other form of shortage, then you’re going to have a problem.  Consider storing things that go with each other, so you will have all the ingredients together to make your meals.  I have a few favorites that work for my family.

One of them is Chili Mac.  You guessed it, a box of  macaroni and cheese and a can of chili.  You have to also have canned milk and be able to make this without butter, just in case butter isn’t available at the time.  It’s not bad and it’s easy to make.  Also store water.  Noodles need some of that to cook in.  I re-use milk jugs with the screw on caps, and the heavy plastic Apple juice jugs with screw on caps are even better.  I just wash them out thoroughly and refill them with tap water.  It already has all the additives it needs to keep for a while (not years, but months).  I store the milk jugs in the basement or around the bathroom floor, because milk jugs sometimes break down too fast, but the heavy plastic apple juice jugs can be washed out, refilled and stored anywhere.  They hold up longer.

The other thing you have to consider when storing things for disasters is how to cook it.  A hibachi grill is pretty good.  You need to store charcoal and fluid (please store lighter fluids in an Outside storage area).  Or some of the camp stoves and their accompanying fuel cylinders (again, please store these in cool, dry spaces away from your living/sleeping areas).   I have found that a three wick candle under a coffee can can cook a meal as well.  A three wick candle is easy to store and won’t accidentally blow up, so I like to store these.  You do have to keep the candles and matches out of the reach of children.  I recommend a locked storage, or child safe cabinet if you have small children around.

In case you fear you’ll get tired of chili mac, here’s another recipe for food storage items that work for us.

Beef stroganoff:  You’ll need

1 two quart sauce pan

1 small skillet

6 cups water to cook in

1 lb. package of egg noodles

1 16 oz. can of cream of chicken soup

1 16 oz. can of beef chunks

1 tablespoon of your favorite seasoning mixture

(mine are a mixture of salt, turmeric, garlic powder, onion powder, new mexico chili powder/Paprika)

Cook the noodles in the six cups of water till done and then add the cream of chicken soup.

Open the beef chunks and drain the water into something else (don’t use it in the cooking, I don’t know about you, but I don’t like the flavor of the water in the beef chunks)

Put the beef chunks in a skillet and add the seasoning mixture.  Let simmer for a few minutes, then add the seasoned beef chunks to the noodles and soup mixture. Stir together and serve.

*If you have butter, or margarine, you can simmer the beef chunks in that before adding to the noodles.

My family loves this meal.  You can also use cream of mushroom in this recipe if your family like mushrooms.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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