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Monthly Archives: February 2012

For Ellen and Aletia

Life is full of collisions

Always faced with decisions

Which choice is the best to make

where will it lead if this road I take

So we choose

and sometimes lose

but I maintain

we cannot be certain

that if we chose the other

the result would have been better

For Maggie, who chose …

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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This Haiku was for Maggie, who was having  a bad day.

Released To Grow

Growing into strength

I’m holding my head so high

I believe I am

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Karwan Bazar, one of the most important busine...

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A map of the languages spoken in Bangladesh, i...

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Dhaka

Dhaka (Photo credit: eGuide Travel)

Botanical Garden Dhaka Bangladesh 4

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English: Agriculture in Bangladesh

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Pohela Boishakh (Bengali new year) celebration...

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These

Haiku‘s were inspired by a new friend  from Dhaka, Bangladesh.   This is where I began writing this series.

 

The Workout

I work to survive

Survival of the fittest

means I must be fit

 

My new friend is a social worker in Dhaka, Bangladesh

To New Friends

Sending a request

All the way to Bangladesh

To become your friend

 

Poem Drawn

I made a new friend

He’s in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Working poetry

 

Mathematical Relay

Poetic sentence

Haiku form 5 7 5

relays the message

 

Computation Error

The syllable count

Inadequate Substitute

Expressed as an On

 

Loose Thoughts

The prose isn’t taut

Still I hope to accomplish

some semblance of thought

 

Haiku Hang-up

I wonder if I

could communicate as well

in small sentences

 

Conceptual Realization

Scaling the message

Requires consideration

In such a format

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

English: Analysis of haiku. Русский: анализ ха...

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Rossetti was interested in figures locked in e...

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English: Maggie-Ellen at Brinian Maggie-Ellen ...

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I’ve been practicing poetic forms in another forum, and I’ve created not a few Haiku’s while there. Some of them are pretty good, and some of them are simple, and some of them are both.  I’ll leave it up to you to decide which ones are worth reading, but I’m going to include a few of them here together.

So as to not get the titles confused with the actual form,  the Titles of each are in bold italics.  I hope you enjoy the reading.

These next few are dedicated to Maggie, who’s thoughts were the inspiration for them.

 

Lighter Than

Inspiring sun light

Wakes me with it’s gentle rays

Sends me warmed, to bed

 

Sum Total

Life experience

and a long journey, equals

a wealth of knowledge

 

Present Treasure

A new Horizon

Provides a Welcome Vista

To my Memories

 

Soul Balm

All the memories

The days of splendid beauty

Bring blessed relief.

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Japanese destroyer JS Kongo (DDG 173) passes t...

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The U.S. Navy battleship USS Arizona (BB-39) a...

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The forward magazines of the U.S. Navy battles...

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The real oil price was low during the post-war...

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US Navy 061203-N-4774B-014 The rusted hull of ...

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English: SeaWiFS collected this view of the Ar...

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Map of the Arabian peninsula according to the ...

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English: The high-rise architectures at Shibam...

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New York Mercantile Exchange prices for West T...

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Economy

Economy (Photo credit: owenstache)

The Strait of Hormuz (red arrow) relative to t...

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I was listening to my daughter and her friend as they talked about their homework.  They had been given a list of movies to watch about wars.  We had just watched Pearl Harbor.  It was a well made movie that neither promoted nor ridiculed war, but simply told a story that gave a decent impression of some of the real human suffering that occurred here in the states, and told some of the reasons for what happened. The fact that Japan had Imperial ambitions in China and needed the oil that was being embargoed was the main reason for their attack on Pearl Harbor.

A world war is never started by just one thing, though there is often enough a catalyst for it.  We have many of the factors in place now for another one to blossom; we are just waiting for the catalyst now.  So let’s look at some of the factors that make for a road to world wide ruin and destruction.  Some of you are probably thinking that the bad economies all over are it, but that’s not enough by itself; in fact, that won’t do it at all, if people are sensible and pull together, but we have a Much more solid reason than that hanging over us now, and it has been for at least a decade.

We have become a bloodthirsty people.  We are all looking for a fight.  We are all ready to pick a fight over the stupidest things.  The rhetoric for it has been in place for a while.  You can see it in the comments after news articles, and entertainment pieces, and sports stories.  We Want to Hurt each other. People all over the world want to hurt each other.  We want to do it here in our own country, and when you throw a reason to hurt someone in another country at us, we have all kinds of people ready to jump on that as well.  It doesn’t have to be a good reason, just any reason.

Then you add a bad economy into it.  Not enough jobs, and those that are available are too low paying to make the rent, let alone the other bills.  Two paycheck households are becoming a necessity, and three or more is becoming more popular, as families move in with each other.  Tensions run high under these circumstances.  Rats in a cage… lobsters in a pot ready to boil.

Now we get to throw in radical weather patterns that squeeze people in all kinds of new ways (and I’m not talking about global warming).  Too cold or too hot requires larger and larger amounts of energy to power an electric grid or a heating oil demand that shoves the price up for lack of ability to meet it fast enough.

Because oil prices go up, food prices go up with them.  Prices that we Have to meet, because we have to have this to survive.

Now we get to add in a nuclear fear.  One emanating from a country that has had at it’s core for many years, the ideal of wiping off the map another country.  One that it restates almost daily, like a mantra, to pacify it’s people, so they won’t blame their own poor government for the mess they are in.  Now the world, that is, most of the European neighbors, Israel, and the United States, and maybe a few others as well, want to impose economic sanctions against this country, because they think that if they choke it enough, it’ll cry uncle and give up it’s nuclear ambitions.

I’d like to point out,that Europe tried that with Germany after World War I.  They were choked good and solid.  As it happens, squeezing a country until the economic life is nearly choked out of it, does Not prevent a country from being able to develop a military, nor prevent it from creating weapons, nor stop it from wanting to get back at it’s neighbors who are choking the economic life out of it.

As it happens, this country is in an ideal location to put a hurt on not only it’s neighbors, but the rest of the world as well, should we think of opposing it in it’s mad rush to get strong enough to actually follow through on it’s rhetoric of wiping out another country; never mind that in doing so, it would also wipe out people it claims to support (Palestinians).   Iran is situated in such a way that with only  a little effort on it’s part, it can close a small shipping passage that happens to carry a large amount of crude oil traffic through it out to the broad, broad world.

Now the brilliant minds out there are thinking, the price of oil will go up, and we have oil here, and I could just buy shares in oil stock and get rich off this dastardly result (heh, heh, heh…).; But this isn’t all folks, yes, just like the famous Ginshu knives, there’s yet another sharp blade in this package.  If you look at a picture of the map where the Straight of Hormuz is, you might notice that on the other side of that large land mass that is the Arabian Peninsula, there is a little country called Yemen.

I don’t know how many of you have noticed any of the news out of there lately, but I have, and it’s not pretty either.  They are a poor country, and as a result, they have a serious problem with terrorists.  The government of Yemen is working closely with other governments to keep the problem in check, but as we have seen more than a few times before, the more we try to stifle a problem, the more it struggles to rise up and bite us.  If this one rises up and bites, it could put another whole lot of hurt on us all, and wouldn’t you know it, but they might get some help for their struggle from someone else we are trying to stifle.

Yemen also sits on an oil shipping  choke point.  At the point where the Gulf of Aden buts up to the Red Sea is another narrow passage of water.  Now Yemen isn’t by itself perhaps such a threat, but what if it gets help from a bigger, more well equipped neighbor?  How long would a stand-off at those two choke points take to bring the rest of the world to the overheated boil that always signals war?  I’m betting it wouldn’t be as long as anyone would like to think.  Probably not as long as any of the government think tanks would give us either.

The repercussions of a sudden choking off of regularly delivered and expected flows of oil into countries that had ordered it, and were waiting for it would be devastating in a very short amount of time.  It wouldn’t Just be gas rationing. Not Just long lines at the gas pumps.  It would be shortages of such magnitude that it would imperil the shipping of food supplies, vital repair parts, needed and necessary supplies to finish projects already underway, and would utterly prevent any new projects from being started.

Public transportation would be affected.  Labor difficulties and job layoffs would be exacerbated by it, housing difficulties would expand, and riots would occur as food became more difficult to obtain because no one has the gas to get where they need to go; not consumers, not retail suppliers, not wholesalers, and not even the farmers could get their product to the market.

Sure, you could make a killing in the oil shares, but what good would that do you when the food riots will destroy the city you live in?  Better make sure you have what you need to eat first, then make a killing in oil and natural gas futures.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Latter-day Saints believe in the resurrected J...

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Brigham Young

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Turn of the century photograph of the entire f...

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English: Portrait of Mormon polygamists in pri...
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Now I would like to address the issue of Polygamy and the numerous comments made about “Mormon” beliefs.

The practice of polygamy was instituted in the early Church to address a serious shortage of men within the church, and the fact that people had a problem with supporting the widows and orphans under their trying circumstances.

There were many individuals who felt that just taking care of their own family was already too difficult and that they couldn’t afford to assist people outside their family unit.  Obviously, this left the only feasible way to solve the dilemma, short of forced donations (which the Church has never been wont to do) as being done within a family unit; therefore, to do so and maintain righteousness, it would involve marriage.

There is some discrepancy on the reporting of the numbers, but everyone agrees it was never more than five percent of the males that had more than one wife, and some posit it as being as few as two percent.

No man could marry more than one wife without the consent of his first wife.

The wives owned the property.  If a wife wanted out, she was welcomed to do so, and she took her property with her.

The Prophet Brigham Young, who was married to 17 women, had several of them divorce him.  Not because he was a bad man, but because they didn’t become the favorite, or couldn’t get their way, or because they couldn’t get along with the rest of the family members.  In a family that large, this is not hard to imagine occurring. No one replaced the First wife.

Marrying these women was  a way to make sure of their support. There was no thought of getting around a no cheating rule.  It was not a way to have some kind of harem.

Were some plural marriages more successful than others?  Sure.  As in all relationships, the parties within the marriage were responsible for their own happiness,  If they were cheerful, and cooperative with each other, and lived righteously, there was more harmony; if not, than not so much.

When the United States passed a law, outlawing polygamy well after the civil war was over ( It was not illegal before that), then The Church, as is in keeping with the beliefs of being subject to the laws of the land, stopped supporting plural marriages in the states.  Some of the members who had had successful marriages and had lots of children, etc.  moved to Mexico so as to not be where it was illegal.

Some of the men who had plural wives at the time of the passing of the law went to jail rather than have to choose to divorce one of their wives.

Some got divorced from all but one woman, and some plural marriages came to an end through natural consequences.

It had been over forty years since the institution of this practice, and the imbalance of women to men worked itself out, for the most part.

As to the ones today who call themselves Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints….  They are Not members of  Christ’s Church, but of doctrine of their own devising.  Those who follow their doctrine do so for their own reasons, and not because it is a correct tradition.

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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