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I’m going to apologize up front.  This is going to be a rant.  A Milk Rant.  I love whole milk.  It’s my favorite drink.  I grew up on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and whole milk.  They were the main staple in my picky-eater diet.  Milk is still my mainstay.  Whole milk. It’s my go to food when I’m in a hurry.  It’s my re-hydrater after a really hard work out. It’s my snack between meals, and my treat when I get home from work.

For a while there, when I was a child, we even had real, whole, un-homogenized milk straight from the dairy farm.  That milk had a Lot of cream in it.  It would rise to the top when the milk sat for a little bit.  We would skim part of it off and put it into a quart jar and shake it for about 45 minutes and turn it into butter.  Even after we did that, there was plenty of cream left in the milk to make it taste good.  It was wonderful milk.  And I never got fat on any of it.  We just didn’t have the total caloric intake to make that happen. Not for any of  the 13 of us (including step siblings).  We weren’t starving, but we didn’t any of us get heavy.

The milk at the grocery store had to have at least 5% volume of cream left in it to qualify as whole milk.  It tasted pretty good.  Then they came up with 2% Milk.  Yechchch!   And then 1% milk.   Bleh!   And the final insult was the even worse skim milk, which had no taste of milk at all, just awfulness. Ptuie!!!!

So Ok, I bought 5% pasteurized homogenized milk my whole life.  Until lately.  What is this stuff?  I bought a gallon of milk with the red cap on it, like it always had when it used to say it had 5% milk fat in it.  My mouth was watering for it.  I was all set to quench my thirst with that rich cool liquid food.  I filled a mug with it and raised it to my lips, poured it over my tongue and swallowed.  “What,  I thought, is wrong with this?”   I tried it again, savoring the liquid for a bit to sort out what was different.  “It tastes like it doesn’t have enough fat in it”, I thought.  I called my teenage daughter over and asked her to try it. She likes milk almost as much as I do.  She raised the cup to her lips and tasted the milk.  A puzzled expression came over her face.  She tried it again.  Yep. she said, it’s 2%.

We both looked at the labeling, in case we accidentally bought some that said 2% but had a red cap on it.  Nope.  There’s no indication at all of the percentage of total milk fat.  They have changed the labeling.  It doesn’t say what the cream percentage is anymore.  It has a whole lot of percent daily value per serving going on in it, but nothing about the volume of cream in the milk.  I compared the new jug of milk to an older jug that I bought from a different store.  We had drunk that milk and then cleaned out the jug and put water in it for emergency storage.  Surprise, it too had no indication of the total percent volume of milk fat in it.  That gallon of milk, though, didn’t taste like 2%.   It  tasted normal.

So, what is the deal?  Why the change in labeling?  Are you trying to change over all the milk to a lower fat volume without us noticing it?  It’s not going to work for those of us who are true milk lovers.  I never liked the 2% milk.  It’s barely recognizable as milk.  It’s tolerable if it’s added to sugary cereal, or if you add chocolate to it, but otherwise I’d just as soon not drink it.  By the way, adding 2% milk to sugary cereal doesn’t reduce your total caloric intake.  It raises it. No fat, plus sugar does not equal a diet food.  And who wants to drink a glass of reduced fat milk with a carrot or an apple anyway?  No one.  It’s wholly unsatisfying and therefore will not work.

Stop the nonsense and get back to real food.  The milk fat levels for whole milk should remain at 5%.  And put it back on the label!

 

© Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ellen M Story and emariaenterprises with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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5 Comments

  1. I have to experiment with some things to see if I can use rice milk in place of whole milk for recipes, etc.
    If it is possible, rice is something that you can put into food storage.;

  2. But SOY messes with Thyroid.
    It seems you cant win.

  3. Good news is you don’t have to incorporate the lactaid into the recipe … but I will bring the box for the meal.

  4. I feel for you , on the lactose intolerance. I don’t know what I would do if I couldn’t drink milk….. I guess I would decrease my intake and switch to the lactaid types like you did. They are so expensive. :/ There are some soy based creamers on the market that taste like milk when mixed properly. Some of the flavored liquid kinds in the dairy cases work for people with lactose intolerance too, but they are pre-sweetened, for coffee, or tea… They are expensive too.
    I like the idea of making those cream pies and ice cream and cheesy cream dinner dishes with the lactaid 🙂 Yummmmm.
    Does the pre-cooked condensed canned milk have the same effect on you?
    One of my daughters is also lactose intolerant. :{ and she’s probably the one who needs milk the most. Oh well, I guess she has adapted her diet to her needs too. I’ve seen her sometimes put half water and half milk in her cereal. That seemed to work for her OK.

  5. I can recall when 2% came on the market, and the “watered down” feeling. From the two bowls of morning cereal to the big glass with dinner, I drank my share of milk …. then suddenly …. Lactose intolerance entered my life.

    I know that Lactaid now exists, but I seldom have cereal or drink any milk … thus saving the Lactaid for ice cream, cream pies, or cheesy/cream dinner dishes.

    Nonetheless … I understand you pain.


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  1. By Don’t Mess With Mom « emariaenterprises on 21 Nov 2011 at 2:17 am

    […] introducing her to you and it’s her turn to be a guest on my blog.  After reading the post I just published, she was laughing, and wanted to comment on the value she thinks milk brings to my […]

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